IBBYbanner-Colour-1000

Fall 2014, Vol. 34, No. 3
ISSN 1704-6033

In this issue:


Letter from the Editor

Fall has always been my favourite season. Even though it’s been years since I’ve been in school, I still get that back-to-school excitement in September, which I often channel through new projects and extensive reading lists.

Traditionally, the fall is also an exciting season for the publishing industry – with major frontlist releases and numerous award ceremonies – and IBBY Canada is no exception to that rule. September is one of our busiest months, both internationally with the IBBY Congress, this year hosted by Mexico City, and also in Canada with The Word On The Street events in Toronto and Halifax. It’s also when IBBY Canada is busy with programming for the Joanne Fitzgerald Illustrator in Residence Program. We’re excited to share news with you about these activities and more in this fall issue of the newsletter.

I Dreamt … A Book About Hope by Gabriela Olmos, translated by Amado (Groundwood Books, 2013). First published in Spanish as Soñé que las  pistolas disparaban mariposas, copyright © 2012. Reprinted with permission from  Groundwood Books Ltd. www.groundwoodbooks.com

I Dreamt … A Book About Hope by Gabriela Olmos, translated by Amado (Groundwood Books, 2013). First published in Spanish as Soñé que las pistolas disparaban mariposas, copyright © 2012. Reprinted with permission from Groundwood Books Ltd.

As busy as IBBY is here in Canada, I’d like to remind you about our efforts abroad to rebuild libraries in Gaza. Malala Yousafzai, the 17-year-old winner of this year’s Nobel Peace Prize, has helped to bring attention to this most important cause by donating $50,000 to rebuild these libraries. IBBY’s Children in Crisis Fund is still accepting donations to assist with this devastating loss. Please take a moment to read our appeal and to consider making a donation.

Another way to contribute to the Children in Crisis Fund is by purchasing I Dreamt… A Book About Hope (Groundwood Books, 2013). This powerful book was created by artists from Mexico, where an ongoing war against drugs has deeply affected children across the country. The book aims to help children talk about their fears and hope for a better world. Royalties from each sale will be donated to the Children in Crisis Fund.

I hope everyone is having a lovely fall, and enjoying some of the most beautiful days of the year that the season brings.

– Katie Scott, Newsletter Editor
back to top

Mot de l’éditrice

L’automne a toujours été ma saison préférée. Même si cela fait des années que je ne me suis plus retrouvée sur les bancs d’école, j’ai encore ce sentiment de participer à la rentrée en septembre, ce qui m’inspire à entreprendre de nouveaux projets et à parcourir de nombreuses listes de livres à lire.

De façon traditionnelle, l’automne est aussi une saison en ébullition pour l’industrie de l’édition, grâce à de nombreuses sorties de livres et remises de prix, et IBBY Canada n’échappe pas à la règle. Le mois de septembre est l’un des mois les plus chargés que ce soit à l’international, avec le congrès d’IBBY qui se tiendra cette année à Mexico, ou ici au Canada avec l’événement The Word On The Street qui se déroulera à Toronto et à Halifax. De plus, c’est à l’automne qu’IBBY Canada organise le Programme Johanne Fitzgerald illustrateur en résidence. Aussi, cela nous fait un énorme plaisir de partager toutes ces activités avec vous dans cette édition automnale de notre bulletin des nouvelles.

Bien qu’IBBY soit très occupé ici au Canada, j’aimerais aussi vous rappeler nos efforts visant à reconstruire des bibliothèques à Gaza. Le Fonds IBBY pour enfants en milieux de crise accepte encore des dons pour aider à pallier à cette horrible perte. Je vous prie de prendre un moment pour lire notre appel et envisager l’envoi d’un don.

Un autre moyen de faire un don au Fonds est d’acheter le livre I Dreamt… A Book About Hope (Groundwood Books, 2013). Ce livre influent est l’œuvre d’artistes au Mexique, où une guerre sans fin contre la drogue bouleverse la vie de nombreux enfants. Ce livre a pour but d’aider les enfants à parler de leurs peurs et de leur espoir d’un monde meilleur. Les redevances de chaque vente seront remises au Fonds IBBY pour enfants en milieux de crise.

J’espère que tout le monde profitera d’un bel automne et des beaux jours que cette saison nous promet.

-Katie Scott, Éditrice de l’infolettre
Traduction : Yveline Jean-Charles
back to top


President’s Report

Shannon Babcock (left) and Meghan Howe (right) at the IBBY Congress in Mexico City. Photo courtesy of Shannon Babcock

Shannon Babcock (right) and Meghan Howe (left) at the IBBY Congress in Mexico City. Photo courtesy of Shannon Babcock

Since our last newsletter, there has been lots of IBBY news to share, both in Canada and internationally.

In September I had the great privilege of attending the 34th biennial IBBY Congress in Mexico City in my capacity as President of IBBY Canada. Canada had a very strong presence at this year’s Congress. Not only did we have about a dozen delegates in attendance, there were two Canadian poster presentations, a parallel session by a Canadian member, the Canadian Honour Books on display, and the presentation of the IBBY-Asahi Reading Promotion Award to the Children’s Book Bank, which was nominated by IBBY Canada.

The Congress theme was “Reading as an inclusive experience — May everyone really mean everyone,” and as such, parallel sessions, panel discussions, and presentations focussed on notions of inclusion in every possible form, from representation of diverse voices in children’s literature, to publishing in indigenous languages, to the access to and form of the literature itself.

Kim Beatty of the Children’s Book Bank at the presentation of the IBBY-Asahi Reading Promotion Award. Photo courtesy of Shannon Babcock

Kim Beatty of the Children’s Book Bank at the presentation of the IBBY-Asahi Reading Promotion Award. Photo courtesy of Shannon Babcock

Participating in the Congress was a wonderful reminder of the importance that local actions have in a global context. The new IBBY President Wally de Doncker gave a moving address reminding us of IBBY’s mission. You can read the speech in its entirety on the IBBY website. For more about the Congress, there is an article in this issue from Meghan Howe, our Liaison CCBC, who was also in attendance.

In October, IBBY was present at the Frankfurt Book Fair, where the nominees for the Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award were announced. Congratulations to all the nominees, especially our Canadian candidates, the Canadian Children’s Book Centre, Sarah Ellis and Marie-Francine Hébert.

In light of the events of the summer wherein two IBBY libraries in Gaza were destroyed, there has been renewed appeal from the Children in Crisis Fund to rebuild and refurbish these libraries.

Shannon Babcock (left) and Yvette Ghione (right) at the IBBY Canada booth during INSPIRE! Toronto International Book Fair. Photo courtesy of Liz Page.

Shannon Babcock (left) and Yvette Ghione (right) at the IBBY Canada booth during INSPIRE! Toronto International Book Fair. Photo courtesy of Liz Page

Here in Canada, Toronto Public Library played host to the second Joanne Fitzgerald Illustrator in Residence Program throughout the month of October. Patricia Storms was this year’s illustrator, and by all reports it was a very successful month.

This November, for the first time ever, INSPIRE! Toronto International Book Fair was held in Toronto. IBBY Canada had a booth and also participated in a special workshop highlighting the IBBY Collection of Books for Young People with Disabilities. The workshop was led by Liz Page, the Executive Director of IBBY who traveled all the way from Basel, Switzerland; Heidi Boiesen, the former director of the Collection when it was housed in Norway; and Leigh Turina and Sharon Moynes of Toronto Public Library.

Sharon Moynes (right) of Toronto Public Library with Liz Page (left) and Heidi Boiesen (middle) at a workshop on the IBBY Collection of Books for Young People with Disabilities during INSPIRE! Toronto International Book Fair. Photo courtesy of Helena Aalto

Sharon Moynes (right) of Toronto Public Library with Liz Page (left) and Heidi Boiesen (middle) at a workshop on the IBBY Collection of Books for Young People with Disabilities during INSPIRE! Toronto International Book Fair. Photo courtesy of Helena Aalto

In addition, the calls for submissions for both the Frances E. Russell Grant and the Elizabeth Mrazik-Cleaver Canadian Picture Book Award have gone out. We look forward to rewarding excellence in Canadian children’s literature research and illustration.

Thank you, IBBY Canada members, for your ongoing support and dedication to supporting children’s literature and literacy in Canada. Thanks to you, everyone does mean everyone.

– Shannon Babcock, President
back to top

Rapport de la Présidente

Bonjour, chers membres d’IBBY Canada !

Il y a beaucoup de nouvelles à partager depuis notre dernier numéro, des nouvelles du Canada et d’ailleurs.

Au mois de septembre, j’ai eu le grand privilège d’assister au 34ième congrès d’IBBY à Mexico dans mon rôle de présidente d’IBBY Canada. Il y avait beaucoup de participation canadienne : plusieurs délégués canadiens (environ une douzaine), deux présentations d’affiches sur la littérature jeunesse canadienne, un atelier donné par un membre d’IBBY Canada, une exposition des livres d’honneur canadiens, et le prix ASAHI de promotion de la lecture qui a été remis à l’organisme Canadian Children’s Book Bank, nommé par IBBY Canada. Parmi les activités très appréciés figurait la présentation des lauréats pour les livres d’honneurs, le prix ASAHI, et bien sûr, le prix Hans Christian Andersen.

Le thème du congrès était « Tout le monde veut dire tout le monde »; les ateliers, les discussions en groupe et les présentations portaient tous sur la notion d’inclusion sous toutes ses formes, allant de la représentation de voix diverses en passant par la publication en langue autochtone jusqu’à comment améliorer l’accès à la lecture pour les jeunes.

Participer au congrès a souligné combien nos actions locales ont une incidence mondiale. Le nouveau président d’IBBY, Wally De Donker, a rappelé de façon émouvante la mission d’IBBY. Vous pouvez lire son discours ici (en anglais seulement). Si vous voulez en savoir plus long sur le congrès, lisez l’article de Meghan Howe, notre liaison CCBC, un peu plus loin.

Au mois d’octobre, IBBY a participé à la foire internationale du livre à Francfort, où les livres en nomination pour le prix Astrid Lindgren ont été annoncées. Félicitations à tous, et plus particulièrement aux canadiennes Sarah Ellis et Marie-Francine Hébert et au CCBB (Centre du livre jeunesse canadien).

Le Fonds IBBY pour enfants en milieux de crise a renouvelé son appel pour la reconstruction des deux bibliothèques IBBY qui avaient été détruites l’été dernier à Gaza.

Ici au Canada, le deuxième Programme Joanne Fitzgerald illustrateur en résidence a été organisé à la bibliothèque publique de Toronto. Cette année, l’illustratrice choisie était Patricia Stoms, et encore cette année le programme d’une durée d’un mois a connu du succès. Vous pourrez lire l’article là-dessus plus loin.

Au mois de novembre, la foire du livre internationale de Toronto INSPIRE! a eu lieu pour la toute première fois. Il y avait un kiosque IBBY Canada et IBBY a également participé à un atelier spécial mettant en vedette la collection d’IBBY de livres pour jeunes ayant un handicap. L’atelier a été organisé par Liz Page de la Suisse, directrice exécutive d’IBBY international, et Heidi Boisen, ancienne directrice de la collection en Norvège ainsi que par nos collègues de la bibliothèque publique de Toronto Leigh Turina et Sharon Moynes.

De plus, les appels de soumissions ont été lancés pour La bourse Frances E. Russell et Le prix Elizabeth Mrazik-Cleaver pour le meilleur livre d’images Canadien. Nous avons ainsi honneur de récompenser l’excellence dans le domaine des recherches en littérature jeunesse et dans l’illustration au Canada.

Merci à vous, chers membres, pour votre soutien, et votre dévouement en matière de littérature jeunesse et d’alphabétisation ici au Canada. Grâce à vous, tout le monde veut vraiment dire tout le monde.

– Shannon Babcock, Présidente
back to top


Regional Report: East

IBBY Canada’s booth at Halifax’s The Word On The Street on September 21, 2014. Photo courtesy of Jane Baskwill

IBBY Canada’s booth at Halifax’s The Word On The Street on September 21, 2014. Photo courtesy of Jane Baskwill

It was another beautiful, warm fall day for The Word On The Street (WOTS), which took place on the Halifax waterfront on September 21, 2014. As always, it was busy with locals and tourists alike. The IBBY Canada booth was located in the Family Market area. Our proximity to Woozles Children’s Bookstore and other booths of interest to families meant that there was a lot of traffic stopping at our booth. In addition, students from my children’s literature class were there in full force with a “WOTS Hunt” that ensured they had an in-depth look at the many participants at WOTS, including IBBY.

Collecting donations for the Children in Crisis Fund at Halifax’s The Word On The Street. Photo courtesy of Jane Baskwill

Collecting donations for the Children in Crisis Fund at Halifax’s The Word On The Street. Photo courtesy of Jane Baskwill

There were many inquiries about the work IBBY does and lots of interest in the international awards from the overseas visitors. It was a good opportunity to remind former members (especially librarians and teachers) that they should consider renewing their membership. Hopefully this will result in them doing so!

A focus of the table was the Children in Crisis Fund. This seemed to strike a chord with all who stopped by the booth. We had a spare change container to collect donations for the libraries in Gaza. A teacher thought this would be a great fundraising project to do with her students. Once again, this was a wonderful opportunity to talk about IBBY and all things books!

– Jane Baskwill, Regional Councillor East
back to top

Rapport régional de l’Est

Le festival Word On The Street a eu lieu au bord de l’eau à Halifax le 21 septembre 2014, un beau jour chaud d’automne. Comme toujours, il y avait beaucoup de monde, des résidents ainsi que des touristes. Le kiosque d’IBBY Canada se trouvait près du marché des familles. Le fait de nous trouver près du kiosque de la librairie jeunesse Woozles et d’autres kiosques attirant des familles nous a amené beaucoup de curieux. Tous les étudiants de mon cours de littérature jeunesse y ont fait un Chasse aux trésors WOTS, ce qui leur a permis d’en savoir plus long sur tous les organismes participant au Festival, y compris IBBY.

Plusieurs personnes ont posé des questions au sujet du travail d’IBBY et les visiteurs d’outre-mer se sont intéressés plus particulièrement aux prix internationaux. C’était aussi une bonne occasion de rappeler aux anciens membres (surtout des bibliothécaires et des enseignants) qu’il serait le moment de renouveller leur adhésion. Espérons que c’est effectivement ce qu’ils feront!

Le kiosque a mis l’accent sur le Fonds IBBY pour enfants en milieux de crise, ce qui semblait toucher tout ceux qui s’y sont arrêtés. Nous avons aussi accepté des dons pour les bibliothèques à Gaza. Une enseignante a mentionné qu’il s’agirait là d’un bon projet de levée de fonds pour ses élèves. Encore une fois, c’était une belle occasion de parler d’IBBY et du monde des livres !

– Jane Baskwill, Conseillère régionale est
Traduction : Todd Kyle
back to top


Regional Report: Quebec

Last march, I became the IBBY Canada Regional Councillor Quebec. My name is Lyne Rajotte, and I am a school librarian for a school board north of Montreal.

Even though IBBY was founded in 1953, its objectives are still relevant today. Children’s literature is a privileged tool to influence a child. As a librarian, I have often seen children who were either sad or anxious before a literary activity, then forget about their problems while performing the activity and, for some, for a long time after the activity. Reading is a way to escape.

On the organization’s website, I was particularly touched by the IBBY Children in Crisis Fund, which believes in “the therapeutic use of books and storytelling in the form of bibliotherapy.” And it’s true! Any time, anywhere, we need to work toward not depriving a child’s environment of books, so the child will always be able to find a book to learn from or to escape with, depending on the needs or desires of the child.

I still need to get used to my new responsibilities, but I hope to be, for you, an excellent spokesperson.

– Lyne Rajotte, Regional Councillor Quebec
Translation : Yveline Jean-Charles
back to top

Rapport régional du Québec

En mars dernier, je suis devenue la conseillère pour le Québec au sein d’IBBY Canada. Je m’appelle Lyne Rajotte et je suis bibliothécaire dans une commission scolaire au nord de Montréal.

Même si l’organisation IBBY fut fondée en 1953, ses objectifs restent toujours actuels. La littérature jeunesse est un moyen privilégié de rejoindre l’enfant. Dans ma pratique de bibliothécaire, j’ai souvent observé qu’un enfant qui se sentait triste ou perturbé avant une activité littéraire parvenait à oublier sa peine durant l’activité et parfois même au-delà de cette période. La lecture permet l’évasion !

Sur le site de l’organisation, j’ai éte tout particulièrement touchée par le programme du Fonds IBBY pour enfants en milieux de crise, qui prône « la bibliothérapie et son utilisation de livres et de récits. » Et c’est vrai que c’est thérapeutique ! En tout temps, en tous lieux, nous devons travailler à ce que l’environnement d’un enfant ne soit jamais exempt de livres, qu’il puisse toujours mettre la main sur l’un d’eux pour apprendre ou pour s’évader, selon son désir ou son besoin.

Je dois encore me familiariser avec mes nouvelles fonctions, mais j’espère être pour vous une excellente représentante.

– Lyne Rajotte, Conseillère régionale Québec
back to top


Regional Report: Ontario

Catherine Mitchell (back), Leslie Clement (front left), and Kathleen Bailey (front right) at the 2014 Word On The Street in Toronto. Photo courtesy of Catherine Mitchell

Catherine Mitchell (back), Leslie Clement (front left), and Kathleen Bailey (front right) at the 2014 Word On The Street in Toronto. Photo courtesy of Catherine Mitchell

Queen’s Park Circle, the venue for Toronto’s 25th annual The Word On The Street, was packed on September 21, 2014, despite an inauspicious start to the day. The rain stopped and thunderclouds parted long enough for adults and children to enjoy the many activities and booths that lined the circle. IBBY Canada’s booth had a great location on Literacy Lane between the Frontier College and World Literacy Canada booths and near the Bookmobile, TD Children’s Literature Tent, Children’s Activity Tent and TVOKids Stage.

Thanks to Brenda Halliday and Theo Heras for their behind-the-scenes assistance, and to Helena Aalto, Grace Andrews, Kathleen Bailey and Catherine Mitchell for answering questions and giving out information throughout the day. Save the date for next year’s The Word On The Street: September 27, 2015, to be held at Harbourfront Centre in a new partnership with the International Festival of Authors.

– Leslie Clement, Regional Councillor Ontario
back to top

Rapport régional de l’Ontario

Autour de Queen’s Park à Toronto, s’est déroulé le 25ième festival Word On The Street, où les visiteurs étaient nombreux le 21 septembre 2014, malgré la journée pluvieuse qui s’annoncait. La pluie a cessé et les nuages d’orage se sont écartés assez longtemps pour permettre aux adultes et aux enfants de profiter des multiples activités et kiosques qui longeaient le cercle. Le kiosque d’IBBY Canada était très bien situé dans ce qui était appelée la ruelle d’alphabétisation, entre les kiosques de Frontier College et World Literacy Canada et tout près de la bibliothèque mobile, la tente d’alphabétisation jeunesse TD, la tente des activités jeunesse et la scène TVOKids.

Merci à Brenda Halliday et à Theo Heras pour leur aide, et à Helena Aalto, Grace Andrews, Kathleen Bailey et Catherine Mitchell pour avoir bien voulu répondre aux questions et donner des renseignements tout au long de la journée. Le festival de 2015 aura lieu le 27 septembre au Centre Harbourfront dans le cadre d’un nouveau partenariat avec le Festival international des auteurs.

– Leslie Clement, Conseillière régionale Ontario
Traduction : Todd Kyle
back to top


REMINDER Call for Submissions: Elizabeth Mrazik-Cleaver Canadian Picture Book Award

IBBY Canada is now accepting submissions for the Elizabeth Mrazik-Cleaver Canadian Picture Book Award. The award celebrates books published between January 1, 2014 and December 31, 2014.

The deadline for entries is December 15, 2014. The full submission guidelines are available here.

back to top

RAPPEL Appel de candidature: Le prix Elizabeth Mrazik-Cleaver pour le meilleur livre d’images Canadien

IBBY Canada accepte maintenant les candidatures pour Le prix Elizabeth Mrazik-Cleaver pour le meilleur livre d’images Canadien. Le prix récompense les livres publiés entre le 1er janvier 2014 et le 31 décembre 2014.

La date limite pour les soumissions est le 15 décembre 2014. Vous trouverez les lignes directrices pour les soumissions sur notre site web.

Traduction : Susane Duchesne
back to top


Call for Proposals: 2014 Frances E. Russell Grant

IBBY Canada is now accepting proposals for the 2014 Frances E. Russell Grant. The $1,000 grant is intended to support IBBY Canada’s mission “to initiate and encourage research in young people’s literature in all its forms” and is given in support of research for a publishable work (a book or a paper) on Canadian children’s literature.

The deadline for proposals, which may be submitted in English or in French, is December 15, 2014.

The grant supports scholarly work only; works of fiction are not eligible. The types of works that are eligible for the 2014 Frances E. Russell Grant include:

  1. Studies of individual authors and their work, especially if considered in their socio-historical context.
  2. Comparative studies of two or more authors, which illuminate their stylistic differences, or consider their social and historical approaches.
  3. Subject/Genre overviews, for example, children’s fantasy or historical fiction.
  4. Biographical studies of Canadian children’s authors or illustrators.
  5. Studies of Canadian children’s illustrators and their work.
  6. Related subjects including contemporary theoretical approaches to the study of Canadian children’s literature.

The following materials are required: a proposal, a curriculum vitae, a synopsis of methods and stages by which the applicant will pursue the research, and a summary of what the funds are to be used for. The competition is open to Canadian citizens or landed immigrants. Please send proposals as email attachments to: Deirdre Baker, Frances E. Russell Grant Chair, at russell@ibby-canada.org.

Proposals can also be sent by mail to:

IBBY Canada
c/o The Canadian Children’s Book Centre
Suite 217, 40 Orchard View Blvd.
Toronto, ON  M4R 1B9
Attention: Deirdre Baker, Frances E. Russell Grant Chair

A jury, appointed by IBBY Canada, will select the successful applicant by January 31, 2015.

About the Frances E. Russell Grant

The Frances E. Russell Grant was established by the late Marjorie Russell in memory of her sister, a longtime supporter of IBBY Canada. Past recipients include Bonnie Tulloch, Beverley Brenna, Paulette Rothbauer, Vivian Howard, Gail Edwards and Judith Saltman, Michelle Mulder, André Gagnon, Ronald Jobe, Carole Carpenter, Linda Granfield, and Françoise Lepage. For more information about the Frances E. Russell Grant, please visit the IBBY Canada website or write to info@ibby-canada.org.

back to top

Appel de candidatures : La bourse Frances E. Russell 2014

IBBY Canada accepte maintenant les soumissions pour la bourse Frances E. Russell 2014. La bourse au montant de 1 000 $ est destiné à soutenir la mission d’IBBY Canada, laquelle consiste à « susciter et encourager la recherche en littérature jeunesse sous toutes ses formes » et est remise pour un travail de recherche publiable (un livre ou un article) portant sur la littérature canadienne pour la jeunesse.

La date d’échéance pour la remise des soumissions (qui peuvent être présentées en anglais ou en français) est le 15 décembre 2014.

La bourse ne s’adresse qu’au travail d’universitaires; les œuvres de fiction ne sont pas admissibles. Les types de travaux qui sont admissibles à la bourse Frances E. Russell 2014 comprennent :

  1. Étude sur un auteur et son oeuvre, particulièrement dans son contexte socio-historique.
  2. Étude comparative d’au moins deux auteurs, mettant en lumière leurs différences stylistiques, ou leurs approches sociales et historiques.
  3. Aperçu d’un sujet /genre, par exemple, la littérature fantastique ou la les romans historiques.
  4. Des études biographiques d’auteurs ou d’illustrateurs canadiens de livres pour la jeunesse.
  5. Étude sur les illustrateurs canadiens et leur œuvre.
  6. Sujets connexes, y compris les approches théoriques contemporaines en matière d’études sur la littérature canadienne pour la jeunesse.

Les documents suivants doivent accompagnés la soumission : une proposition, un curriculum vitae, un résumé des méthodes et des étapes par lesquelles la requérante poursuivra sa recherche, et un résumé de l’utilisation prévue des fonds. Le concours est ouvert aux citoyens canadiens et aux immigrants reçus. Veuillez faire parvenir vos propositions en pièces jointes à : Deirdre Baker, présidente, bourse Frances E. Russell, russell@ibby-canada.org.

Il est également possible d’envoyer les propositions par la poste à :

IBBY Canada
a/s The Canadian Children’s Book Centre
40 boul. Orchard View, bureau 217
Toronto (Ontario) M4R 1B9
À l’attention de : Deirdre Baker, présidente, bourse Frances E. Russell

Un jury, nommé par IBBY Canada, choisira le candidat gagnant avant le 31 janvier 2015.

La bourse Frances E. Russell
Marjorie Russell, maintenant décédée, a établi la bourse Frances E. Russell en souvenir de sa sœur Frances qui a longtemps appuyé les activités d’IBBY Canada. Au cours des années antérieures, la bourse a été accordée à Bonnie Tulloch, Beverley Brenna, Paulette Rothbauer, Vivian Howard, Gail Edwards et Judith Saltman, Michelle Mulder, André Gagnon, Ronald Jobe, Carole Carpenter, Linda Granfield et Françoise Lepage. Pour de plus amples renseignements sur IBBY et la bourse Frances E. Russell, veuillez consulter le site web d’IBBY Canada ou écrire à info@ibby-canada.org.

back to top


Canadian Graphic Novels: Rich Resources on Local Shelves

Beverley Brenna, recipient of the 2012 Frances E. Russell Grant. Photo courtesy of Beverley Brenna

Dr. Beverley Brenna, recipient of the 2012 Frances E. Russell Grant. Photo courtesy of Beverley Brenna

I was very fortunate to receive the 2012 Frances E. Russell Grant from IBBY Canada, allowing me to purchase the set of books necessary for a number of research activities and related dissemination projects. As a result, my work has served to develop a portrait of Canadian literature and identified various roles for this literature in Canadian classrooms and other learning contexts.

Since acquiring the graphic novel collection, I have published one refereed article on the subject, profiled an annotated bibliography on my professional website, and completed a draft of an article for Canadian Children’s Book News. The novels have been used in readers’ workshops with my undergraduate and graduate students at the University of Saskatchewan and are soon to appear in a set available for borrowing from our Education and Music Library.

Many of the graphic novels were utilized in a qualitative study that explored the use of graphic novels as key reading texts for elementary students involved in a reading support program. With the help of a research assistant and a classroom teacher, we examined the application of reading comprehension strategies in the context of the graphic novel resources, discovering that these resources elicited metacognitive comprehension strategies related to self-awareness, task-awareness, and text-awareness. Results of this study suggested the usefulness of the graphic novel form to support reading instruction with general classroom populations (Sloboda, Brenna, and Kosowan-Kirk, 2014).

A standard bibliography as well as an annotated bibliography of the set of Canadian graphic novels has recently been included on a page of my professional website. This bibliography serves to provide information on Canadian children’s literature for pre-service and in-service teachers, as well as young people and other audiences. Here, readers can explore a number of contemporary titles: the Binky series by Ashley Spires, a favourite with younger children; works such as Kathryn E. Shoemaker’s adaption of Irene Watts’s holocaust title for intermediate grades, Good-bye Marianne; and Lesley Fairfield’s honest look at teen eating disorders in Tyranny.

Working with one graduate student and two undergraduate student assistants, I developed a draft of a professional article “Canadian Graphic Novels: What’s New?” for Canadian Children’s Book News, which is in the process of revision. This article identifies that the graphic novel form is evolving into a solid resource for Canadian classrooms, based on its potential to demonstrate multiple genres, support the teaching and learning of multiple comprehension strategies, and both delight and support readers with multimodal messages. What was originally considered a form for struggling or reluctant readers, and narrowly viewed as a support for male readers or readers where English is a second language, is moving into general classroom circles as a staple for young readers. I am delighted to report that numbers of Canadian graphic novels for young people are on the rise, that these titles vary in tone and theme – going beyond their darker and more adventure-based historical counterparts – and offer a way into reading that for some children is instrumental in building lifelong interests in reading for information and enjoyment.

Thanks, IBBY Canada, for assisting me in identifying these local resources and helping them gain further involvement in teaching and learning.

References
Sloboda, M.A., B.A. Brenna, and C. Kosowan-Kirk. 2014. “Comprehension strategies in practice through a graphic novel study.” Journal of Reading Education, 39(2), 17-22.

– Dr. Beverley Brenna, Acting Associate Dean of Undergraduate Programs, Partnerships and Research, University of Saskatchewan and recipient of the 2012 Frances E. Russell Grant
back to top


Call for Nominations: 2014 Claude Aubry Award

IBBY Canada is now inviting nominations for the 2014 Claude Aubry Award.

IBBY Canada presents two Claude Aubry Awards biennially: one for distinguished service within the field of Canadian children’s literature in English and one for distinguished service within the field of Canadian children’s literature in French. Eligible nominees include authors, publishers, illustrators, translators, designers, editors, librarians, booksellers, teachers, or any individuals who have made a significant contribution to Canadian children’s literature.

The deadline for 2014 Claude Aubry Award nominations, which may be submitted in English or in French, is December 20, 2014.

Nominations should include a short biographical profile of the nominee, highlighting his or her contributions. Send nominations to Susane Duchesne, Claude Aubry Award Chair, at aubry@ibby-canada.org. A jury, appointed by IBBY Canada, will select two Claude Aubry Award winners to be announced at the annual Meeting of Members on February 28, 2015.

About the Claude Aubry Award
Claude Aubry, director of the Ottawa Public Library from 1953 until his retirement in 1979, was also an award-winning children’s book author and translator who travelled nationally and internationally to promote his own work and that of other Canadian authors. Aubry was named to the Order of Canada and made an officer of the Ordre International du Bien Public (France). To recognize his many achievements, IBBY Canada established the Claude Aubry Award in his honour in 1981. Previous recipients include Patsy Aldana, Marie-Louise Gay, Andrea Deakin, Chantal Vaillancourt, Dave Jenkinson, Charlotte Guérette, Peter Carver, Catherine Mitchell, Bertrand Gauthier, and Michael Solomon. For a complete list and biographical information about previous award winners, please visit our website.

back to top

Appel de candidatures : Prix Claude Aubry 2014

IBBY Canada accepte maintenant les candidatures pour le prix Claude Aubry 2014.

IBBY Canada présente deux prix Claude Aubry tous les deux ans : l’un pour services distingués dans le domaine de la littérature jeunesse canadienne en anglais, et l’autre pour services distingués dans le domaine de la littérature jeunesse canadienne en français. Les auteurs, éditeurs, illustrateurs, traducteurs, concepteurs, réviseurs, bibliothécaires, libraires, enseignants, ou toute personne ayant apporté une contribution importante à la littérature canadienne pour la jeunesse sont admissibles.

Le 20 décembre 2014 est la date limite pour la remise des candidatures en vue du prix Claude Aubry; celles-ci peuvent être soumises soit en anglais soit en français.

Les candidatures doivent inclure un court profil biographique du candidat soulignant ses contributions. Veuillez faire parvenir les candidatures à Susane Duchesne, présidente du prix Claude Aubry, à aubry@ibby-canada.org. Un jury, nommé par IBBY Canada, sélectionnera deux lauréats qui seront annoncés lors de la réunion annuelle des membres le 28 février 2015.

Prix Claude Aubry
Claude Aubry, directeur de la Bibliothèque publique d’Ottawa de 1953 jusqu’à sa retraite en 1979, était également auteur de livres primés pour enfants et traducteur qui a voyagé à travers le monde pour promouvoir son propre travail et celui d’autres auteurs canadiens. M. Aubry a été nommé membre à l’Ordre du Canada et officier de l’Ordre International du Bien Public (France). Afin de reconnaître ses nombreuses réalisations, IBBY Canada a créé le Prix Claude Aubry en son honneur en 1981. Quelques lauréats précédents du prix Aubry sont : Patsy Aldana, Marie-Louise Gay, Andrea Deakin, Chantal Vaillancourt, Dave Jenkinson, Charlotte Guérette, Peter Carver, Catherine Mitchell, Bertrand Gauthier et Michael Solomon. Pour une liste complète des récipiendaires et leurs biographies, consultez le site web d’IBBY Canada.

back to top


The 2014 Joanne Fitzgerald Illustrator in Residence Program

Patricia Storms (left), recipient of the 2014 Joanne Fitzgerald Illustrator in Residence Program. Martha Newbigging (right) received the inaugural residency in 2013. Photo courtesy of Helena Aalto

Patricia Storms (left), recipient of the 2014 Joanne Fitzgerald Illustrator in Residence Program. Martha Newbigging (right) received the inaugural residency in 2013. Photo courtesy of Helena Aalto

The second annual Joanne Fitzgerald Illustrator in Residence Program was launched on October 1, 2014. Members and friends of IBBY Canada gathered at the Northern District branch of Toronto Public Library to kick off the month-long residency.

In attendance were Joanne Fitzgerald’s family, including her husband Robert Young who spoke of how much Joanne loved meeting and interacting with young readers. This residency in her name honours that special interaction through a month of programming at Toronto Public Library with a Canadian children’s illustrator.

Patricia Storms with students from Seneca College during the 2014 Joanne Fitzgerald Illustrator in Residence Program. Photo courtesy of Helena Aalto

Patricia Storms with students from Seneca College during the 2014 Joanne Fitzgerald Illustrator in Residence Program. Photo courtesy of Helena Aalto

Patricia Storms, this year’s illustrator in residence, spoke of how picture books are a portable art gallery and how she spent many hours as a child pouring over books in her local library. It’s so fitting that in the month of October she would take up “residency” in one such library! In a month packed full of events, Patricia participated in many class visits, met with illustrators for portfolio reviews, and held a number of workshops on illustrating for children.

Congratulations, Patricia, on making this residency such a success this year, and to Helena Aalto, whose incredible contribution and dedication made this year’s programming possible.

– Katie Scott, Newsletter Editor
back to top


Canadian Selection for the IBBY Collection of Books for Young People with Disabilities

Publishers from all across Canada answered the call for books for the IBBY Collection of Books for Young People with Disabilities. The collection, now housed at the North York Central branch of Toronto Public Library, focuses on books for and about children and young people with disabilities. The Collection was first established in 1985 in Norway, and moved to Toronto Public Library in 2014. It currently holds 4,000 books in 40 languages.

As stated by the IBBY Secretariat:

“Many young people with disabilities cannot read or enjoy a regular book, nor do they manage to find suitable books among the many publications that might meet their needs. They may need books in specialized formats such as Braille, or books from regular production that answer special needs. The more successful books combine a profound knowledge of various special needs along with excellent literary and artistic content. The objective of this IBBY project is to collect examples of books for young people with disabilities which answer their needs.”

The Collection’s aims are:

  • to promote IBBY’s fundamental belief that all children, including those with disabilities, should be able to enjoy books;
  • to gather excellent examples of books for young people with disabilities and to introduce the collection internationally;
  • to encourage the production, promotion and dissemination of suitable books: including books especially made for young people with disabilities as well as regular books serving special needs;
  • to recommend books for young people that depict people with disabilities, emphasizing similarities rather than differences, and which can give all readers the possibility of identification and understanding.

IBBY national sections nominate books for the Collection that, in their estimation, are excellent examples of books for or about children with disabilities. This year seven dedicated IBBY Canada members and friends read and evaluated 70 books in French and English. They are Grace Andrews, Mariella Bertelli, Janet Haynes, Iana Georgieva-Kaluba, Pam Mountain, Martha Scott, and committee chair Theo Heras. Of those 70 books, 33 were selected to be part of the IBBY Collection of Books for Young People with Disabilities.

In addition, three books were selected for the Outstanding Books for Young People with Disabilities list. Every two years, the Collection publishes this list of Outstanding Books in a catalogue and circulates the books around the world in two travelling exhibitions. The new exhibition and Outstanding Books list will be launched at the 2015 Bologna Children’s Book Fair, March 30–April 2, 2015.

– Theo Heras, 2nd Vice-President
back to top

La sélection canadienne pour la Collection IBBY de livres pour enfants avec handicaps

Des éditeurs de tout le Canada ont répondu à l’appel de soumissions pour la Collection IBBY de livres pour enfants avec handicaps. Abritée à la succursale North York de la Bibliothèque publique de Toronto, la collection se spécialise dans les livres pour enfants et pour adolescents ayant un handicap. Cette collection a été mise sur pied en Norvège en 1985 et on l’a déménagé en 2014 à la Bibliothèque publique de Toronto. Elle rassemble 4 000 livres en 40 langues.

Dans les mots du Secrétariat d’IBBY :

«  De nombreuses personnes ayant un handicap ne peuvent lire ou profiter de la plupart de livres ni trouver de livre approprié parmi les nombreuses publications qui pourraient répondre à leurs besoins. Ce qu’il leur faut, ce sont des formats spécialisés, par exemple en braille, ou encore des livres de la production régulière qui répondent à des besoins particuliers. Les livres les mieux adaptés allient une connaissance profonde de divers besoins spéciaux à une grande qualité littéraire et l’excellence du contenu artistique. L’objectif de ce projet IBBY est de collectionner des exemplaires de livres qui répondent aux besoins des enfants ayant un handicap. »

Les objectifs de la collection sont de :

  • Promouvoir la conviction fondamentale d’IBBY, à savoir que tous les enfants, y compris ceux ayant des handicaps, devraient avoir l’occasion d’apprécier les livres;
  • Rassembler d’excellents exemplaires de livres pour enfants ayant un handicap et de présenter la collection à l’échelle internationale;
  • Encourager la production, la promotion et la diffusion de livres appropriés, y compris des livres faits à l’intention d’enfants ayant un handicap et des livres réguliers répondant à des besoins particuliers;
  • Recommander des livres pour enfants dont les personnages ont un handicap, en soulignant les similitudes plutôt que les différences et en donnant aux lecteurs la possibilité de s’y identifier et de mieux les comprendre.

Les sections nationales d’IBBY proposent des livres pour la collection qui, d’après eux, représentent d’excellents exemples de livres à l’intention de ou à propos d’enfants ayant un handicap. Cette année, sept membres d’IBBY Canada ont lu et évalué 70 livres en français et en anglais. Les membres du comité sont : Grace Andrews, Mariella Bertelli, Janet Haynes, Iana Georgieva-Kaluba, Pam Mountain, Martha Scott et la présidente du comité, Theo Heras. Sur ces 70 livres, 33 ont été sélectionnés pour faire partie de la Collection IBBY de livres pour enfants ayant un handicap.

De plus, trois d’entre eux ont été choisis pour faire partie de la sélection Livres exceptionnels pour enfants ayant un handicap. Tous les deux ans, cette liste est publiée dans un catalogue et les livres circulent grâce à deux expositions itinérantes. La nouvelle exposition et la liste Livres exceptionnels pour enfants ayant un handicap seront lancées lors de la Foire du livre pour enfants de Bologne du 30 mars au 2 avril 2015.

– Theo Heras, Deuxième vice-présidente
Traduction : Josiane Polidori
back to top


IBBY Honour List 2014

IBBY is pleased to announce the full selection of titles for the 2014 IBBY Honour List. The list comprises the best in children’s literature from around the world, as nominated by IBBY’s national sections, and was on display at the IBBY Congress in Mexico City from September 10–13, 2014.

The full Honor List is available on IBBY’s website.

A recap of the Canadian selection of titles is available in our Spring 2014 issue.

back to top

Liste d’honneur IBBY 2014

IBBY Canada a le plaisir d’annoncer la sélection complète de titres pour la liste d’honneur IBBY 2014. La liste comprend les meilleurs livres pour enfants du monde entier, nommés par les sections nationales d’IBBY, et a été présentée lors du congrès IBBY à Mexico du 10 au 13 septembre 2014.

Vous pourrez consulter la liste d’honneur sur le site web d’IBBY.

Un récapitulatif de la sélection canadienne est disponible dans notre publication du printemps 2014.

Traduction : Susane Duchesne
back to top


Nominees for the 2015 Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award

CCBClogoIBBY Canada has nominated the Canadian Children’s Book Centre for the 2015 Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award. The announcement of the finalists was made on October 9, 2014, at the Frankfurt Book Fair.

The following grounds for nomination appeared in our submission:

“The Canadian Children’s Book Centre (CCBC) is a national, not‐for‐profit organization, founded in 1976, that is dedicated to encouraging, promoting and supporting the reading, writing, illustrating and publishing of Canadian books for young readers. It has regional collections in five cities across Canada, and provides programs, publications, and resources to help teachers, librarians, booksellers, and parents select the very best for young readers. It administers seven annual awards for Canadian children’s literature.”

Canadian Children’s Book Centre (CCBC), IBBY Canada’s nominee for the 2015 Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award. Photo courtesy of the CCBC

Canadian Children’s Book Centre (CCBC), IBBY Canada’s nominee for the 2015 Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award. Photo courtesy of the CCBC

Essays in support of the nomination came from Maria Martella, owner of Tinlids Inc., a children’s and teen book wholesaler; Catherine Mitchell, Children’s Book Publishing Consultant; and Judith Saltman, Professor and Chair, Master of Arts in Children’s Literature Program, University of British Columbia.

The 2015 laureate will be announced on March 31, 2015, at the Bologna Children’s Book Fair.

About the Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award
The Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award (ALMA) is the world’s largest award for children’s and young adult literature and is worth SEK 5 million (approx. CAD $773,000). For the full list of nominees, and more information on the award, please visit their website.

– Merle Harris, Regional Councillor Alberta
back to top


Q&A: Deborah Soria’s Andersen Jury Experience

Deborah Soria is a bookseller and promoter of children’s literature, based in Rome, Italy. We took a minute to chat with Deborah about her experience sitting on the 2014 Hans Christian Andersen Awards jury. Here’s what we found out . . .

Q: Tell us about the moment you found out you were going to be on the jury.

A: You have to apply to be on the jury by sending your CV and a letter saying why you would be a good juror. I had applied two years earlier but hadn’t been selected, so I was very happy and honoured to have been named a juror this time around.

Q: How long was the whole process, from when you reviewed the first submission to the announcement of the final winners?

A: Books started to arrive in the summer of 2013, and then the jury met from March 15 to 16, 2014. The shortlist was announced March 17, 2014, and the final announcement, announcing the winners, was made at the Bologna Children’s Book Fair on March 24, 2014. So in total, that is about eight to nine months.

Q: On top of your day job and sitting on the jury, you’re also involved with IBBY Italia and their initiatives in Lampedusa. How did you find time to juggle it all?

A: Oh, yes, we can’t forget the normal job, too! It was okay, apart from giving up some weekends and some social meetings. It’s a lot of reading … but it’s okay for someone who loves children’s literature.

Q: The award is truly an international one – even the jury members are from around the world, from Cuba to South Korea. How did the jury work together to select the shortlist and final winners?

A: We had the possibility to exchange our opinions while we were reading through a secret chat that IBBY set up for us. Then we met at the March meeting and it was very exciting to meet and talk in person. It was a great experience.

Q: The people on the jury also bring a variety of experiences, from publishers and editors to creators to academics. What was it like working with such a diverse group of people?

A: We were all very similar in our love of children’s literature, even if in different jobs as publishers, academics, and booksellers like myself. We may see things from a different angle, but books touch our hearts in similar ways. In fact, I thought I had a very unique taste for books, but I was amazed to find that others were on the same page!

Q: What’s your most memorable experience about being on the jury?

I think the most memorable thing was actually seeing ideas take shape. Someone would be against something or some decision, but after listening carefully to someone else he or she would say, “You’re right, actually. I change my mind!”

I think only really intelligent people can do that. A real conversation only happens when you have the courage to be brave enough to change your mind!

Q: Tell us a little bit about this year’s winners. What made them stand out from the rest?

We decided we would look for winners that could take literature out of the familiar Western tradition. We wanted to give a message that children’s literature is a guide for the spirit and for the world’s ideas. We decided other influences should reach children of today all over the world.

Nahoko Uehashi is a Japanese author and an anthropologist. Her stories are about history and a devotional respect for nature. But they are lively and very adventurous. They don’t try to teach, or preach, about ecology or respect. They aim to tell us you can have different ideas and you should fight for them, but be delicate and gentle at the same time.

Roger Mello is an artist from Brazil. His illustrations are different from what “we” (the established book world) usually look for. But he is alive and real and he talks an indigenous free language.

I am very proud of our choices. I am sure the world of books needs to look at these authors the way we did.

Q: Any final thoughts?

I will finish off by saying that the Andersen Prize was the best jury I ever sat on. I was told part of it is luck. Apparently some juries get into great discussions … and don’t have much fun at all. But I loved the serious approach everyone had, the way we were totally free, and the way every single artist’s work was respected and taken into great consideration.

back to top

Entrevue avec Deborah Soria, membre du jury des Prix Hans Christian Andersen 2014

Deborah Soria est une libraire basée à Rome (Italie) qui fait aussi la promotion de la littérature jeunesse. Nous avons passé un peu de temps avec Deborah pour échanger sur son expérience au sein du jury des Prix Hans Christian Andersen (HCA) de 2014. Voici ce dont nous avons discuté . . .

Q: Parlez-nous du moment où vous avez appris que vous alliez siéger au jury HCA.

R: Il faut faire une demande pour siéger au jury HCA en envoyant son CV et une lettre d’intention. J’avais déjà fait la demande il y a deux ans sans être choisie, donc j’étais très heureuse et très honorée d’avoir été nommée au jury cette fois-ci.

Q: Combien de temps dure tout le processus, à partir du moment où vous recevez les premières soumissions jusqu’à l’annonce des lauréats ?

R: Les livres ont commencé à arriver au cours de l’été 2013 et le jury s’est réuni du 15 au 16 mars 2014. La liste des finalistes a été annoncée le 17 mars 2014 et l’annonce des lauréats s’est faite lors de la Foire du livre pour enfants à Bologne (Italie) le 24 mars 2014. Au total, cela fait de huit à neuf mois.

Q: En plus de votre travail quotidien et de votre rôle en tant que membre du jury, vous travaillez aussi avec IBBY Italia et leurs initiatives à Lampedusa. Comment trouvez-vous le temps de gérer tout cela ?

R: Et oui, il ne faut pas oublier son vrai emploi ! Tout allait bien, sauf qu’il me fallait consacrer quelques fins de semaine au traveil et ne pas participer à quelques activités sociales. J’ai lu beaucoup … mais cela convient à quelqu’un qui aime la littérature jeunesse.

Q: Ce prix est vraiment international – même les membres du jury proviennent du monde entier, de Cuba jusqu’à la Corée du Sud. Comment les membres du jury ont-ils travaillé ensemble pour sélectionner les finalistes et les lauréats ?

R: Nous avons pu partager nos opinions pendant la lecture grâce à un lien de clavardage privé mis en place par IBBY. Puis nous nous sommes rencontrés en mars et c’était très gratifiant de nous rencontrer et de nous parler en personne. C’était une expérience formidable.

Q: Les personnes siégeant au jury représentent toute une gamme d’expériences, depuis des éditeurs et directeurs de collection jusqu’aux créateurs ou aux universitaires. Comment était-ce de travailler avec un groupe de personnes si varié?

R: Nous avions tous la même passion pour la littérature jeunesse, malgré nos différents emplois d’éditeurs, d’universitaires ou, dans mon cas, de libraire. Nous pouvions voir les choses sous des angles différents mais les livres nous touchaient de façon similaire. D’ailleurs, moi qui pensais avoir des goûts assez personnels dans le domaine des livres, j’étais fascinée de voir que d’autres pensaient comme moi.

Q: Quelle fut votre expérience la plus mémorable au sein du jury?

R: Je crois que la chose la plus mémorable fut de voir les idées prendre corps. Quelqu’un pouvait être en désaccord avec quelque chose ou avec une décision mais après avoir écouté les autres attentivement, la personne s’exclamait : « Vous avez raison, vraiment. Je change d’idée ! » Je crois que ce n’est que les gens vraiment intelligents qui peuvent faire cela. Une conversation réelle ne peut avoir lieu que si vous avez le courage de changer d’avis !

Q: Que pouvez-vous nous dire à propos des lauréats de cette année-ci ? Comment se démarquent-ils des autres ?

R: Notre choix était de chercher des lauréats qui amèneraient la littérature au-delà de la tradition occidentale bien connue. Nous voulions transmettre un message, à savoir que la littérature jeunesse sert de guide pour l’esprit et pour le monde des idées. Nous avons pris la décision qu’il fallait que d’autres influences rejoignent les enfants d’aujourd’hui partout au monde.

Nahoko Uehashi est écrivaine japonaise et anthropologue. Ses romans portent sur l’histoire et sur le respect et le dévouement envers la nature tout en restant très vivants et pleins d’aventures. Ses histoires ne cherchent pas à enseigner ni à prêcher en matière d’écologie ou de respect. Elles cherchent à nous montrer qu’il est permis d’avoir des idées différentes et que nous devons nous battre pour elles, tout en faisant preuve d’une certaine délicatesse et douceur.

Roger Mello est un artiste du Brésil. Ses illustrations ne répondent pas à ce que « nous » (le milieu plus traditionnel du livre) avons l’habitude de rechercher. Mais il est vivant et authentique et il s’exprime avec la liberté d’une langue indigène.

Je suis très fière de nos choix. Je suis certaine que le monde des livres doit porter le même regard sur ces créateurs que nous.

Q: Avez-vous quelque chose à ajouter ?

Je voudrais terminer en disant que le jury des Prix Andersen est le meilleur jury auquel j’ai eu l’occasion de siéger. L’on me dit qu’il y a une part de chance là-dedans. Paraît-il que certains jurys ont de grandes discussions … et peu de plaisir. Pour ma part, j’ai apprécié l’approche sérieuse adoptée par tout et chacun, la liberté totale dont nous jouissions et la façon dont le travail de chaque artiste était respecté et pris en considération.

Traduction : Josiane Polidori
back to top


2014 IBBY Congress in Mexico City

IBBY Congress attendees gather in the reading room at IBBY México. Photo courtesy of Meghan Howe

IBBY Congress attendees gather in the reading room at IBBY México. Photo courtesy of Meghan Howe

Waking up at 3am is not how I typically like to start my day, but on September 10, 2014, I didn’t mind because I had to get to the airport to catch a flight to Mexico City to attend the IBBY Congress. The theme for the 34th International IBBY Congress was “Reading as an inclusive experience – May everyone really mean everyone.”

The Biblioteca de México played host to the opening ceremony where President of IBBY México/A leer Bruno Newman gave a warm welcome to all of the congress attendees. There were over 971 participants from 66 countries, representing 62 IBBY sections. It was a lovely evening that also celebrated author Nahoko Uehashi of Japan and illustrator Roger Mello of Brazil, winners of the 2014 Hans Christian Andersen Award.

The following days included panel discussions and parallel sessions. I found the Concept of Inclusion Panel very interesting. It included Raymudo Isidro Alavez and Javier Silverio, along with Swedish writer Mónica Zak and US poet John Oliver Simon. Raymundo, a translator and professor, is a member of the indigenous group known as the Otomi people and whose indigenous language dialect is Hñähñu (pronounced na-nu). Raymundo argued that it is important to have new words, but also important to protect their existing ones. He has translated The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry into Hñähñu, thus allowing the Hñähñu children to go beyond their literary borders. Javier Silverio is a member of the publishing collective Taller Leñateros, which is operated by contemporary Mayan artists. Their focus is on getting children to read so that they can create their own books – printed and bound using paper that they’ve made themselves from local fibres.

On the Friday evening of the Congress, we all made our way to the Papalote Museo del Niño (the children’s museum) where the winners of the 2014 IBBY-Asahi Reading Promotion Award – the Children’s Book Bank of Toronto and PRAESA of South Africa – were honoured. It was a proud moment for all of the Canadian delegates as Kim Beatty, Executive Director of the Children’s Book Bank, gave her acceptance speech.

Outside IBBY México. Photo courtesy of Meghan Howe

Outside IBBY México. Photo courtesy of Meghan Howe

On Saturday morning after the final panel discussions Merle Harris, Regional Councillor Alberta, and I took a trip to IBBY México’s headquarters. What an amazing experience this was. Their offices are located in a beautiful century-old house, surrounded by three beautiful gardens. Their library, which is free for anyone to use, is filled with books donated by publishers and the public. If children want to take books out from the library, their guardian is required to purchase an idea card at 100 pesos ($8) that is valid for two years. The library includes a reading room where activities and storytelling take place. There is a room that they refer to as the Colour Room – with each wall painted a vibrant colour. The entire house is designed to welcome all kinds of people with impairments. In addition to the library, IBBY México also has a children’s bookstore where patrons can purchase books. Unfortunately for Merle and I, the store was closed on Saturday.

The bookstore at IBBY México. Photo courtesy of Meghan Howe

The bookstore at IBBY México. Photo courtesy of Meghan Howe

To ensure that all children are included, IBBY México creates books in Braille, audio books and Mexican sign language. Merle and I got a kick out of the video we saw of a Robert Munsch book being read in sign language. We both felt a sense of pride at that moment.

The final day ended with a wonderful concert featuring students from the Carlos Chávez Orchestra School and the Child Choir of the Republic at the Palacio de Bellas Artes, followed by the closing ceremony at the Museo Franz Mayer. Newly elected IBBY President Wally de Doncker gave a wonderful closing speech where he shared his vision for IBBY in the future. You can read his speech on IBBY’s website. We also got to see a sneak preview of what to expect at the 2016 IBBY Congress in Auckland, New Zealand, where they will celebrate the theme of “Literature in a Multi-Literate World.”

My experience at the IBBY Congress was wonderful. There were many familiar faces there, and I had the opportunity to meet a lot of new and interesting people. And to think, we all came together because of our love of children’s literature and our strong belief that every child should have access to books.

– Meghan Howe, Liaison CCBC
back to top

Congrès IBBY 2014 à Mexico

Me réveiller à 3 heures du matin n’est pas ma routine habituelle, mais le 10 septembre 2014, cela ne m’a aucunement dérangé car je me levais pour me rendre à l’aéroport et prendre un avion à destination de Mexico pour assister au Congrès d’IBBY 2014. Le thème de ce 34ième congrès était « Lire comme expérience inclusive – Tout le monde veut dire tout le monde ».

La cérémonie d’ouverture a eu lieu à la Biblioteca de México où le président d’IBBY México/A Leer Bruno Newman a accueilli chaleureusement tous les délégués au congrès. Il y avait plus de 971 participants provenant de 66 pays qui représentaient 62 sections nationales d’IBBY. C’était une belle soirée au cours de laquelle nous avons aussi célébré l’écrivaine Nahoko Uehashi du Japon et l’illustrateur Roger Mello du Brésil, les deux lauréats des prix Hans Christian Andersen 2014.

Au cours des jours qui ont suivi, il y a eu des panels d’experts et des sessions parallèles. J’ai beaucoup apprécié la discussion intitulée Le concept de l’inclusion. Les panelistes étaient Raymundo Isidro Alavez et Javier Silverio ainsi que l’écrivaine suédoise Mónica Zak et le poète américain John Oliver Simon. M. Isidro Alavez est écrivain et professeur appartenant au peuple autochtone otomi dont la langue est le Hñähñu (prononcé gna-gnu). M. Alavez insistait sur l’importance de créer des néologismes tout en protégeant les mots ancestraux. Il a traduit Le Petit Prince d’Antoine de Saint-Exupéry en Hñähñu, offrant ainsi aux enfants otomi les moyens d’aller au-delà de leurs frontières littéraires. Javier Silverio est membre du collectif d’édition Taller Leñateros qui est administré par des artistes mayas contemporains. Leur mandat consiste à encourager les enfants à lire et à créer leurs propres livres imprimés et reliés en utilisant du papier qu’ils font en se servant de fibres locales.

Le vendredi soir, nous sommes tous allés au Papalote Museo del Niño (Musée des enfants) pour célébrer les lauréats du prix IBBY-Asahi 2014, à savoir la Children’s Book Bank de Toronto et PRAESA de l’Afrique du Sud. Les délégués canadiens ont ressenti beaucoup de fierté lorsque Kim Beatty, la directrice exécutive de la Children’s Book Bank (Banque de livres pour enfants) a prononcé son discours de remerciements.

Le samedi matin après la dernière séance plénière, je suis allée avec Merle Harris, conseillère régionale d’Alberta, visiter les bureaux d’IBBY México. Quelle formidable expérience ! Ces bureaux sont situés dans une magnifique maison centenaire entourée de trois superbes jardins. La bibliothèque est ouverte à tous, et elle regorge de livres offerts par des maisons d’édition et par le public. Pour qu’un enfant emprunte des livres, ses parents/tuteurs achètent une carte d’abonnement au prix de 100 pesos (8 $) valide pour deux ans. La bibliothèque comprend une salle de lecture où sont présentées des activités et des heures de contes. Chaque mur de la pièce appelée la Salle des couleurs affiche une couleur vibrante. La maison toute entière est conçue de façon à accueillir les personnes ayant des problèmes d’accès. En plus de la bibliothèque, IBBY México administre une librairie. Malheureusement pour Merle et moi, celle-ci était fermée lors de notre visite.

Pour s’assurer de s’adresser à tous les enfants, IBBY México crée des livres en braille, et des livres audio et en langage gestuel mexicain. Merle et moi étions enchantées du vidéo montrant un livre de Robert Munsch en langage des signes. Nous étions très fières.

La dernière journée s’est terminée avec un magnifique concert mettant en vedette les étudiants de l’orchestre-école Carlos Chavez et du Chœur d’enfants de la République au Palacio de Bellas Artes, suivi par la cérémonie de clôture au Museo Franz Mayer. Le nouveau président élu d’IBBY, Wally de Doncker, a fait un discours mémorable au cours duquel il a partagé sa vision d’avenir pour IBBY. Vous pourrez lire son discours sur le site d’IBBY. Nous avons également eu l’occasion de visionner un bref aperçu du prochain congrès 2016 d’IBBY à Auckland (Nouvelle-Zélande), qui portera sur le thème « La littérature dans un monde à multiples littératies ».

Mon expérience au congrès IBBY fut merveilleuse. Il y avait des visages familiers ici et là mais j’ai aussi eu l’occasion de rencontrer beaucoup de nouvelles personnes intéressantes. Que c’est beau de penser que ce qui nous a rassemblé est notre passion commune pour la littérature jeunesse et notre conviction profonde que chaque enfant est en droit avoir accès aux livres.

– Meghan Howe, Liaison CCBC
Traduction : Josiane Polidori
back to top


News from our Partners

CODE is pleased to announce that Monique Gray Smith is the winner of the 2014 Burt Award for First Nations, Métis and Inuit Literature for her young adult book Tilly: A Story of Hope and Resilience (Sono Nis Press, 2013). For more information about this year’s winner and the other finalists, please visit the CODE website.

Communication-Jeunesse has announced its 36th annual Sélection de livres pour les jeunes, which highlights the best in Quebecois and francophone literature for young readers. Over 300 titles were selected this year, with submissions from over 70 publishers. For more information and for the full list of titles, please visit the Communication-Jeunesse website.

back to top


Upcoming Events

February 28, 2015: IBBY Canada’s Annual Meeting of Members. All IBBY Canada members are welcome to join. It’s a wonderful opportunity to hear about the past year’s accomplishments, meet other members and the board of directors, renew your membership (cash or cheque only), and find out what’s in store for the year ahead. We hope to see you there! Northern District Library, Room 200, 40 Orchard View Blvd., Toronto

back to top


Contributors

Editor: Katie Scott
Copy editor (English): Meghan Howe
Copy editor (French): Susan Ouriou
Formatter: Camilia Kahrizi
Banner illustration: Martha Newbigging
French translation: Susane Duchesne, Yveline Jean-Charles, Todd Kyle, Josiane Polidori